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Nelson "Repentance is a thing that cannot be trifled with every day. Sometimes, of all the people in the world, the one who is the hardest to forgive—as well as perhaps the one who is most in need of our forgiveness—is the person looking back at us in the mirror. It is time to understand why and how repentance is a matter of such great worth to you in your individual life! The Meaning of Repentance.

Jesus Christ preached that the kingdom of heaven is near and brought us the way of repentance. Although we link extensively to www. While repentance is not a work that earns salvation, repentance unto salvation does result in works. Kelly Ogden speeches. Repentance becomes part of our daily lives.

Lee once said that "a goal not written is only a wish. When an individual repents of his sins and lives in harmony with the teachings of Jesus Christ, he receives great knowledge, wisdom, strength and power in his life. Smith Here are the links: Nothing is more liberating, more ennobling, or more crucial to our individual progression than is a regular, daily focus on repentance. I close with two guidelines for giving. The intellect must function, the emotions must be aroused, and the will must act.

I am grateful that changing daily brings me closer to him. True repentance is a radical change of mind and heart that leads to a complete turnabout of our life. Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith, p. Try to support someone struggling to make things right. Jan 25, He knew you would need to repent daily. This faith requires enduring bravely the trials of mortal life.


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But that is inevitable. The fact that you have sorrow and grief over your sin is a good thing. Nelson in April Elder Melvin J. At the beginning of this year I felt strongly to share with my class the many blessings that come from being diligent in our daily scripture study. For those who are looking for resources and stories for Pioneer Day, or are interested in reading more about Mormon pioneers in general, you can read posts from our archives about both 19th-century pioneers and modern-day pioneers.

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We apologize for the inconvenience. Please come back later. What is interesting, according to my friend and expert in German and English, that within the society of Latter-day Saints in Germany there seem to be division based mainly in the previous religious traditions someone came from to become a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Eyring teaches about daily repentance. You have to brush daily to keep yourself clean.

For we know that the law is spiritual, but I am of the flesh, sold under sin. It is the process by which we stay on the narrow way see 2 Nephi It must be made equally clear, that repentance must not be viewed apart from faith in the Saviour, which is an integral part of it. All of salvation, including repentance and faith, is a result of God drawing us, opening our eyes, and changing our hearts. It is the key to happiness and peace of mind. Packer served as an Assistant to the Quorum of the Twelve a position that no longer exists from to , when he was called to the Quorum of Twelve Apostles.

We have the best approach to Christianity on the face of the earth. But in reality, we all need to repent daily. These may seem like to different principles, but they are so inseparably linked that it is impossible to have one without the other. Receiving the Blessings of the Atonement.

Since you are so devoted to your faith it is important for you to know that according to the teachings of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mormons , true repentance means sinless perfectionism. Elder D. His Spirit and daily, moment to moment repentance is the key. Talent News. True repentance is essential because it does deliver from the coming wrath. For me, repentance is a daily exercise. It is not easy. Boyd K.

Any airplane pilot can tell you that vertigo is a dangerous situation to encounter while flying. Daily articles, devotionals, bible study, recipes and more only on iBelieve! A Prayer For Daily Repentance. While there is an expectation that young men will perform a mission, women are welcome pursue one as well.

When the Lord requires that we forgive all men, that includes forgiving ourselves. He then wen't on to describe repentance based on the definitions given in Preach My Gospel. Establish an attitude of ongoing, happy, joyful repentance by making it your lifestyle of choice. Remembering will help us avoid making the same mistakes again.

True faith will make you new. For our turning to the Lord to be complete, it must include nothing less Thanks for your comment. Spurgeon once made the statement: "Brethren, we shall not adjust our Bible to the age, but the age to the Bible. Teaching Thoughts. The Red Headed Hostess. There is someone Repentance is a thing that cannot be trifled with every day.

False repentance never leads to a turning away from sin. In an effort to clear up any confusion about what it means to 'repent,' a co-leader from Harvest Christian Fellowship's student ministries spells out the '5 R's of Repentance' in a recent blog representing the church-led evangelistic youth movement, Uprising.

Experience the strengthening power of daily repentance—of doing and being a little better each day. The simplest and most basic principles of the gospel are sometimes those least understood. All you have to do is believe you are a sinner, that Christ died for your sins, and ask His forgiveness. For other resources, visit lessonhelps. He told the people to believe in the one coming after him, that is, in Jesus.

Try never to do it again. You may read it here on our website if you are interested: If you are looking for a fun, captivating talk for a baptism or Primary or need a great object lesson for Family Home Evening, this simple talk on repentance may be what you need. Throughout my life I have seen God's hand sustaining me through good and hard times. Watch Nick explain his decision to leave the missionary training center. We must free ourselves from the obsession of thoughts.

When we think of repentance, we often think of making mistakes, taking the sacrament, righting our wrongs, and becoming clean again. And, of course, only through repentance do we gain access to the atoning grace of Jesus Christ and salvation. Eyring This is a page devoted to the 12 steps as a whole and devoted to any posts that we write dealing with the steps as a whole.

Religious Organization. Fourth, the fruit of true Biblical repentance is an actual turning from sin. I love her idea as well, check it out! I am so grateful for my Savior, Jesus Christ and know that learning about Him will bring His power and influence into our lives. As a baseball player now that we've had sufficient faith to get on base through our faith and our works, hitting the ball, we need to refocus and have a change of How can repentance help me every day? Handout and lesson idea.

That healing can begin immediately. The house we live in sits on a normal block in an average American community. Daily transgression and daily repentance is not that which is pleasing in the sight of God. Elder Brent H. I need the daily reminders. Christ is literally the reason that I am who I am today. Repentance from dead works applies to everyone. For the last year my Church calling has been teaching Sunday school for the 14 to 18 year olds.

To invite others to come unto Christ by helping them receive the restored gospel through faith in Jesus Christ and His Atonement, repentance, baptism, receiving the gift of the Holy Ghost, and enduring to the end see Preach My Gospel, 1. That wonderful dream cannot become real without great faith - enough for the Holy Ghost to lead us to repentance, baptism, and the making and keeping of sacred covenants with God. My dear Brothers and Sisters, it is wonderful to be with you today. Go Back. Packer on repentance, forgiveness, and Atonement President Boyd K.

Smith later changed the name to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints after he stated he had received a revelation to do so. And then change! All of us can do better and be better than ever before. One of the most fundamental gospel principles is repentance. Daily repentance means frequent correction, like a ship maintaining a course. Oct 5, Explore foofoo's board "YW: As Holderness explained to The Daily Mail, after months of to say that church bishops instead placed the obligation for repentance on them.

This process enables us to have greater love and compassion for those around us. Read our privacy policy. Daily repentance is the pathway to purity, and purity brings power. Teaching kids to see themselves the way their Father in Heaven sees them can really help them understand their worth — regardless of where they are in the repentance process. I have been richly blessed as a result of living the teachings of Jesus Christ and I want to share these blessings with others.

In many countries globalization has meant a hastened deterioration of their own cultural roots and the invasion of ways of thinking and acting proper to other cultures which are economically advanced but ethically debilitated. This fact has been brought up by bishops from various continents in different Synods. The Catholic faith of many peoples is nowadays being challenged by the proliferation of new religious movements, some of which tend to fundamentalism while others seem to propose a spirituality without God.

This is, on the one hand, a human reaction to a materialistic, consumerist and individualistic society, but it is also a means of exploiting the weaknesses of people living in poverty and on the fringes of society, people who make ends meet amid great human suffering and are looking for immediate solutions to their needs. These religious movements, not without a certain shrewdness, come to fill, within a predominantly individualistic culture, a vacuum left by secularist rationalism. We must recognize that if part of our baptized people lack a sense of belonging to the Church, this is also due to certain structures and the occasionally unwelcoming atmosphere of some of our parishes and communities, or to a bureaucratic way of dealing with problems, be they simple or complex, in the lives of our people.

In many places an administrative approach prevails over a pastoral approach, as does a concentration on administering the sacraments apart from other forms of evangelization. The process of secularization tends to reduce the faith and the Church to the sphere of the private and personal. Furthermore, by completely rejecting the transcendent, it has produced a growing deterioration of ethics, a weakening of the sense of personal and collective sin, and a steady increase in relativism.

These have led to a general sense of disorientation, especially in the periods of adolescence and young adulthood which are so vulnerable to change.

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Such claims usually follow from a form of moral relativism that is joined, not without inconsistency, to a belief in the absolute rights of individuals. In response, we need to provide an education which teaches critical thinking and encourages the development of mature moral values.

Despite the tide of secularism which has swept our societies, in many countries — even those where Christians are a minority — the Catholic Church is considered a credible institution by public opinion, and trusted for her solidarity and concern for those in greatest need. Again and again, the Church has acted as a mediator in finding solutions to problems affecting peace, social harmony, the land, the defence of life, human and civil rights, and so forth. And how much good has been done by Catholic schools and universities around the world! This is a good thing. Yet, we find it difficult to make people see that when we raise other questions less palatable to public opinion, we are doing so out of fidelity to precisely the same convictions about human dignity and the common good.

The family is experiencing a profound cultural crisis, as are all communities and social bonds. In the case of the family, the weakening of these bonds is particularly serious because the family is the fundamental cell of society, where we learn to live with others despite our differences and to belong to one another; it is also the place where parents pass on the faith to their children. Marriage now tends to be viewed as a form of mere emotional satisfaction that can be constructed in any way or modified at will.

Jesus' interactions with women

But the indispensible contribution of marriage to society transcends the feelings and momentary needs of the couple. The individualism of our postmodern and globalized era favours a lifestyle which weakens the development and stability of personal relationships and distorts family bonds. Pastoral activity needs to bring out more clearly the fact that our relationship with the Father demands and encourages a communion which heals, promotes and reinforces interpersonal bonds.

Today too, various associations for the defence of rights and the pursuit of noble goals are being founded. This is a sign of the desire of many people to contribute to social and cultural progress. The Christian substratum of certain peoples — most of all in the West — is a living reality. Here we find, especially among the most needy, a moral resource which preserves the values of an authentic Christian humanism. Seeing reality with the eyes of faith, we cannot fail to acknowledge what the Holy Spirit is sowing. It would show a lack of trust in his free and unstinting activity to think that authentic Christian values are absent where great numbers of people have received baptism and express their faith and solidarity with others in a variety of ways.

The immense importance of a culture marked by faith cannot be overlooked; before the onslaught of contemporary secularism an evangelized culture, for all its limits, has many more resources than the mere sum total of believers. An evangelized popular culture contains values of faith and solidarity capable of encouraging the development of a more just and believing society, and possesses a particular wisdom which ought to be gratefully acknowledged.

It is imperative to evangelize cultures in order to inculturate the Gospel. In countries of Catholic tradition, this means encouraging, fostering and reinforcing a richness which already exists. In countries of other religious traditions, or profoundly secularized countries, it will mean sparking new processes for evangelizing culture, even though these will demand long-term planning.

We must keep in mind, however, that we are constantly being called to grow. Each culture and social group needs purification and growth. In the case of the popular cultures of Catholic peoples, we can see deficiencies which need to be healed by the Gospel: machismo, alcoholism, domestic violence, low Mass attendance, fatalistic or superstitious notions which lead to sorcery, and the like.

Popular piety itself can be the starting point for healing and liberation from these deficiencies. It is also true that at times greater emphasis is placed on the outward expressions and traditions of some groups, or on alleged private revelations which would replace all else, than on the impulse of Christian piety. Some people promote these expressions while not being in the least concerned with the advancement of society or the formation of the laity, and in certain cases they do so in order to obtain economic benefits or some power over others.

Nor can we overlook the fact that in recent decades there has been a breakdown in the way Catholics pass down the Christian faith to the young. It is undeniable that many people feel disillusioned and no longer identify with the Catholic tradition. Growing numbers of parents do not bring their children for baptism or teach them how to pray. There is also a certain exodus towards other faith communities. The causes of this breakdown include: a lack of opportunity for dialogue in families, the influence of the communications media, a relativistic subjectivism, unbridled consumerism which feeds the market, lack of pastoral care among the poor, the failure of our institutions to be welcoming, and our difficulty in restoring a mystical adherence to the faith in a pluralistic religious landscape.

The new Jerusalem, the holy city cf. Rev , is the goal towards which all of humanity is moving. We need to look at our cities with a contemplative gaze, a gaze of faith which sees God dwelling in their homes, in their streets and squares. He dwells among them, fostering solidarity, fraternity, and the desire for goodness, truth and justice.

This presence must not be contrived but found, uncovered. God does not hide himself from those who seek him with a sincere heart, even though they do so tentatively, in a vague and haphazard manner. In cities, as opposed to the countryside, the religious dimension of life is expressed by different lifestyles, daily rhythms linked to places and people. In their daily lives people must often struggle for survival and this struggle contains within it a profound understanding of life which often includes a deep religious sense. We must examine this more closely in order to enter into a dialogue like that of our Lord and the Samaritan woman at the well where she sought to quench her thirst cf.

Jn New cultures are constantly being born in these vast new expanses where Christians are no longer the customary interpreters or generators of meaning. Instead, they themselves take from these cultures new languages, symbols, messages and paradigms which propose new approaches to life, approaches often in contrast with the Gospel of Jesus.

A completely new culture has come to life and continues to grow in the cities. The Synod noted that today the changes taking place in these great spaces and the culture which they create are a privileged locus of the new evangelization. Through the influence of the media, rural areas are being affected by the same cultural changes, which are significantly altering their way of life as well. What is called for is an evangelization capable of shedding light on these new ways of relating to God, to others and to the world around us, and inspiring essential values.

It must reach the places where new narratives and paradigms are being formed, bringing the word of Jesus to the inmost soul of our cities.

Cities are multicultural; in the larger cities, a connective network is found in which groups of people share a common imagination and dreams about life, and new human interactions arise, new cultures, invisible cities. Various subcultures exist side by side, and often practise segregation and violence. The Church is called to be at the service of a difficult dialogue. Cities create a sort of permanent ambivalence because, while they offer their residents countless possibilities, they also present many people with any number of obstacles to the full development of their lives.

This contrast causes painful suffering. In many parts of the world, cities are the scene of mass protests where thousands of people call for freedom, a voice in public life, justice and a variety of other demands which, if not properly understood, will not be silenced by force. We cannot ignore the fact that in cities human trafficking, the narcotics trade, the abuse and exploitation of minors, the abandonment of the elderly and infirm, and various forms of corruption and criminal activity take place.

At the same time, what could be significant places of encounter and solidarity often become places of isolation and mutual distrust. Houses and neighbourhoods are more often built to isolate and protect than to connect and integrate. The proclamation of the Gospel will be a basis for restoring the dignity of human life in these contexts, for Jesus desires to pour out an abundance of life upon our cities cf. The unified and complete sense of human life that the Gospel proposes is the best remedy for the ills of our cities, even though we have to realize that a uniform and rigid program of evangelization is not suited to this complex reality.

But to live our human life to the fullest and to meet every challenge as a leaven of Gospel witness in every culture and in every city will make us better Christians and bear fruit in our cities. Temptations faced by pastoral workers. I feel tremendous gratitude to all those who are committed to working in and for the Church. Here I do not wish to discuss at length the activities of the different pastoral workers, from bishops down to those who provide the most humble and hidden services.

Rather, I would like to reflect on the challenges that all of them must face in the context of our current globalized culture. The pain and the shame we feel at the sins of some members of the Church, and at our own, must never make us forget how many Christians are giving their lives in love. They help so many people to be healed or to die in peace in makeshift hospitals. They are present to those enslaved by different addictions in the poorest places on earth. They devote themselves to the education of children and young people. They take care of the elderly who have been forgotten by everyone else.

They look for ways to communicate values in hostile environments.

Why did Jesus wash the disciples feet?

They are dedicated in many other ways to showing an immense love for humanity inspired by the God who became man. I am grateful for the beautiful example given to me by so many Christians who joyfully sacrifice their lives and their time. This witness comforts and sustains me in my own effort to overcome selfishness and to give more fully of myself.

As children of this age, though, all of us are in some way affected by the present globalized culture which, while offering us values and new possibilities, can also limit, condition and ultimately harm us. Yes to the challenge of a missionary spirituality. Today we are seeing in many pastoral workers, including consecrated men and women, an inordinate concern for their personal freedom and relaxation, which leads them to see their work as a mere appendage to their life, as if it were not part of their very identity.

At the same time, the spiritual life comes to be identified with a few religious exercises which can offer a certain comfort but which do not encourage encounter with others, engagement with the world or a passion for evangelization. As a result, one can observe in many agents of evangelization, even though they pray, a heightened individualism, a crisis of identity and a cooling of fervour. These are three evils which fuel one another. As a consequence, many pastoral workers, although they pray, develop a sort of inferiority complex which leads them to relativize or conceal their Christian identity and convictions.

This produces a vicious circle. They end up being unhappy with who they are and what they do; they do not identify with their mission of evangelization and this weakens their commitment. They end up stifling the joy of mission with a kind of obsession about being like everyone else and possessing what everyone else possesses. Their work of evangelization thus becomes forced, and they devote little energy and very limited time to it. Pastoral workers can thus fall into a relativism which, whatever their particular style of spirituality or way of thinking, proves even more dangerous than doctrinal relativism.

It has to do with the deepest and inmost decisions that shape their way of life. This practical relativism consists in acting as if God did not exist, making decisions as if the poor did not exist, setting goals as if others did not exist, working as if people who have not received the Gospel did not exist. It is striking that even some who clearly have solid doctrinal and spiritual convictions frequently fall into a lifestyle which leads to an attachment to financial security, or to a desire for power or human glory at all cost, rather than giving their lives to others in mission.

Let us not allow ourselves to be robbed of missionary enthusiasm! At a time when we most need a missionary dynamism which will bring salt and light to the world, many lay people fear that they may be asked to undertake some apostolic work and they seek to avoid any responsibility that may take away from their free time. For example, it has become very difficult today to find trained parish catechists willing to persevere in this work for some years.

Something similar is also happening with priests who are obsessed with protecting their free time. Some resist giving themselves over completely to mission and thus end up in a state of paralysis and acedia. The problem is not always an excess of activity, but rather activity undertaken badly, without adequate motivation, without a spirituality which would permeate it and make it pleasurable. As a result, work becomes more tiring than necessary, even leading at times to illness.

Far from a content and happy tiredness, this is a tense, burdensome, dissatisfying and, in the end, unbearable fatigue. This pastoral acedia can be caused by a number of things. Some fall into it because they throw themselves into unrealistic projects and are not satisfied simply to do what they reasonably can.

Others, because they lack the patience to allow processes to mature; they want everything to fall from heaven. Others, because they are attached to a few projects or vain dreams of success. Others, because they have lost real contact with people and so depersonalize their work that they are more concerned with the road map than with the journey itself. Others fall into acedia because they are unable to wait; they want to dominate the rhythm of life. For all this, I repeat: Let us not allow ourselves to be robbed of the joy of evangelization! The joy of the Gospel is such that it cannot be taken away from us by anyone or anything cf.

The evils of our world — and those of the Church — must not be excuses for diminishing our commitment and our fervour. Let us look upon them as challenges which can help us to grow. Our faith is challenged to discern how wine can come from water and how wheat can grow in the midst of weeds. Fifty years after the Second Vatican Council , we are distressed by the troubles of our age and far from naive optimism; yet the fact that we are more realistic must not mean that we are any less trusting in the Spirit or less generous. In this modern age they can see nothing but prevarication and ruin … We feel that we must disagree with those prophets of doom who are always forecasting disaster, as though the end of the world were at hand.

Nobody can go off to battle unless he is fully convinced of victory beforehand. If we start without confidence, we have already lost half the battle and we bury our talents. Christian triumph is always a cross, yet a cross which is at the same time a victorious banner borne with aggressive tenderness against the assaults of evil.

The evil spirit of defeatism is brother to the temptation to separate, before its time, the wheat from the weeds; it is the fruit of an anxious and self-centred lack of trust. This is another painful kind of desert. But family and the workplace can also be a parched place where faith nonetheless has to be preserved and communicated. At times, this becomes a heavy cross, but it was from the cross, from his pierced side, that our Lord gave himself to us as a source of living water.

Let us not allow ourselves to be robbed of hope! Yes to the new relationships brought by Christ. Greater possibilities for communication thus turn into greater possibilities for encounter and solidarity for everyone. If we were able to take this route, it would be so good, so soothing, so liberating and hope-filled! To go out of ourselves and to join others is healthy for us. To be self-enclosed is to taste the bitter poison of immanence, and humanity will be worse for every selfish choice we make.

Many try to escape from others and take refuge in the comfort of their privacy or in a small circle of close friends, renouncing the realism of the social aspect of the Gospel. For just as some people want a purely spiritual Christ, without flesh and without the cross, they also want their interpersonal relationships provided by sophisticated equipment, by screens and systems which can be turned on and off on command.

Meanwhile, the Gospel tells us constantly to run the risk of a face-to-face encounter with others, with their physical presence which challenges us, with their pain and their pleas, with their joy which infects us in our close and continuous interaction. True faith in the incarnate Son of God is inseparable from self-giving, from membership in the community, from service, from reconciliation with others. The Son of God, by becoming flesh, summoned us to the revolution of tenderness.

Isolation, which is a version of immanentism, can find expression in a false autonomy which has no place for God. The return to the sacred and the quest for spirituality which mark our own time are ambiguous phenomena. Unless these people find in the Church a spirituality which can offer healing and liberation, and fill them with life and peace, while at the same time summoning them to fraternal communion and missionary fruitfulness, they will end up by being taken in by solutions which neither make life truly human nor give glory to God.

Genuine forms of popular religiosity are incarnate, since they are born of the incarnation of Christian faith in popular culture. For this reason they entail a personal relationship, not with vague spiritual energies or powers, but with God, with Christ, with Mary, with the saints. These devotions are fleshy, they have a face. They are capable of fostering relationships and not just enabling escapism. One important challenge is to show that the solution will never be found in fleeing from a personal and committed relationship with God which at the same time commits us to serving others.

This happens frequently nowadays, as believers seek to hide or keep apart from others, or quietly flit from one place to another or from one task to another, without creating deep and stable bonds. We need to help others to realize that the only way is to learn how to encounter others with the right attitude, which is to accept and esteem them as companions along the way, without interior resistance. Better yet, it means learning to find Jesus in the faces of others, in their voices, in their pleas.

And learning to suffer in the embrace of the crucified Jesus whenever we are unjustly attacked or meet with ingratitude, never tiring of our decision to live in fraternity. There indeed we find true healing, since the way to relate to others which truly heals instead of debilitating us, is a mystical fraternity, a contemplative fraternity. It is a fraternal love capable of seeing the sacred grandeur of our neighbour, of finding God in every human being, of tolerating the nuisances of life in common by clinging to the love of God, of opening the heart to divine love and seeking the happiness of others just as their heavenly Father does.

Mt We are called to bear witness to a constantly new way of living together in fidelity to the Gospel. It takes on many forms, depending on the kinds of persons and groups into which it seeps. Since it is based on carefully cultivated appearances, it is not always linked to outward sin; from without, everything appears as it should be. This worldliness can be fuelled in two deeply interrelated ways. One is the attraction of gnosticism, a purely subjective faith whose only interest is a certain experience or a set of ideas and bits of information which are meant to console and enlighten, but which ultimately keep one imprisoned in his or her own thoughts and feelings.

The other is the self-absorbed promethean neopelagianism of those who ultimately trust only in their own powers and feel superior to others because they observe certain rules or remain intransigently faithful to a particular Catholic style from the past. A supposed soundness of doctrine or discipline leads instead to a narcissistic and authoritarian elitism, whereby instead of evangelizing, one analyzes and classifies others, and instead of opening the door to grace, one exhausts his or her energies in inspecting and verifying.

In neither case is one really concerned about Jesus Christ or others. These are manifestations of an anthropocentric immanentism. It is impossible to think that a genuine evangelizing thrust could emerge from these adulterated forms of Christianity. In this way, the life of the Church turns into a museum piece or something which is the property of a select few. In others, this spiritual worldliness lurks behind a fascination with social and political gain, or pride in their ability to manage practical affairs, or an obsession with programmes of self-help and self-realization.

It can also translate into a concern to be seen, into a social life full of appearances, meetings, dinners and receptions. The mark of Christ, incarnate, crucified and risen, is not present; closed and elite groups are formed, and no effort is made to go forth and seek out those who are distant or the immense multitudes who thirst for Christ. Evangelical fervour is replaced by the empty pleasure of complacency and self-indulgence. This way of thinking also feeds the vainglory of those who are content to have a modicum of power and would rather be the general of a defeated army than a mere private in a unit which continues to fight.

How often we dream up vast apostolic projects, meticulously planned, just like defeated generals! We indulge in endless fantasies and we lose contact with the real lives and difficulties of our people. Those who have fallen into this worldliness look on from above and afar, they reject the prophecy of their brothers and sisters, they discredit those who raise questions, they constantly point out the mistakes of others and they are obsessed by appearances.

Their hearts are open only to the limited horizon of their own immanence and interests, and as a consequence they neither learn from their sins nor are they genuinely open to forgiveness. This is a tremendous corruption disguised as a good. We need to avoid it by making the Church constantly go out from herself, keeping her mission focused on Jesus Christ, and her commitment to the poor.

God save us from a worldly Church with superficial spiritual and pastoral trappings! This stifling worldliness can only be healed by breathing in the pure air of the Holy Spirit who frees us from self-centredness cloaked in an outward religiosity bereft of God. Let us not allow ourselves to be robbed of the Gospel! How many wars take place within the people of God and in our different communities!

In our neighbourhoods and in the workplace, how many wars are caused by envy and jealousy, even among Christians! Spiritual worldliness leads some Christians to war with other Christians who stand in the way of their quest for power, prestige, pleasure and economic security. Instead of belonging to the whole Church in all its rich variety, they belong to this or that group which thinks itself different or special. Our world is being torn apart by wars and violence, and wounded by a widespread individualism which divides human beings, setting them against one another as they pursue their own well-being.

In various countries, conflicts and old divisions from the past are re-emerging. I especially ask Christians in communities throughout the world to offer a radiant and attractive witness of fraternal communion. Beware of the temptation of jealousy! We are all in the same boat and headed to the same port! Let us ask for the grace to rejoice in the gifts of each, which belong to all.

Those wounded by historical divisions find it difficult to accept our invitation to forgiveness and reconciliation, since they think that we are ignoring their pain or are asking them to give up their memory and ideals. But if they see the witness of authentically fraternal and reconciled communities, they will find that witness luminous and attractive. It always pains me greatly to discover how some Christian communities, and even consecrated persons, can tolerate different forms of enmity, division, calumny, defamation, vendetta, jealousy and the desire to impose certain ideas at all costs, even to persecutions which appear as veritable witch hunts.

Whom are we going to evangelize if this is the way we act? Let us ask the Lord to help us understand the law of love. How good it is to have this law! How much good it does us to love one another, in spite of everything. Yes, in spite of everything! We all have our likes and dislikes, and perhaps at this very moment we are angry with someone.

To pray for a person with whom I am irritated is a beautiful step forward in love, and an act of evangelization. Let us do it today! Let us not allow ourselves to be robbed of the ideal of fraternal love! Lay people are, put simply, the vast majority of the people of God. The minority — ordained ministers — are at their service. There has been a growing awareness of the identity and mission of the laity in the Church. We can count on many lay persons, although still not nearly enough, who have a deeply-rooted sense of community and great fidelity to the tasks of charity, catechesis and the celebration of the faith.

At the same time, a clear awareness of this responsibility of the laity, grounded in their baptism and confirmation, does not appear in the same way in all places. In some cases, it is because lay persons have not been given the formation needed to take on important responsibilities. In others, it is because in their particular Churches room has not been made for them to speak and to act, due to an excessive clericalism which keeps them away from decision-making.

Even if many are now involved in the lay ministries, this involvement is not reflected in a greater penetration of Christian values in the social, political and economic sectors. It often remains tied to tasks within the Church, without a real commitment to applying the Gospel to the transformation of society. The formation of the laity and the evangelization of professional and intellectual life represent a significant pastoral challenge.

The Church acknowledges the indispensable contribution which women make to society through the sensitivity, intuition and other distinctive skill sets which they, more than men, tend to possess. I think, for example, of the special concern which women show to others, which finds a particular, even if not exclusive, expression in motherhood. I readily acknowledge that many women share pastoral responsibilities with priests, helping to guide people, families and groups and offering new contributions to theological reflection.

But we need to create still broader opportunities for a more incisive female presence in the Church. Demands that the legitimate rights of women be respected, based on the firm conviction that men and women are equal in dignity, present the Church with profound and challenging questions which cannot be lightly evaded. The reservation of the priesthood to males, as a sign of Christ the Spouse who gives himself in the Eucharist, is not a question open to discussion, but it can prove especially divisive if sacramental power is too closely identified with power in general.

The configuration of the priest to Christ the head — namely, as the principal source of grace — does not imply an exaltation which would set him above others. Youth ministry, as traditionally organized, has also suffered the impact of social changes. Young people often fail to find responses to their concerns, needs, problems and hurts in the usual structures. As adults, we find it hard to listen patiently to them, to appreciate their concerns and demands, and to speak to them in a language they can understand.

For the same reason, our efforts in the field of education do not produce the results expected. The rise and growth of associations and movements mostly made up of young people can be seen as the work of the Holy Spirit, who blazes new trails to meet their expectations and their search for a deep spirituality and a more real sense of belonging. Even if it is not always easy to approach young people, progress has been made in two areas: the awareness that the entire community is called to evangelize and educate the young, and the urgent need for the young to exercise greater leadership.

We should recognize that despite the present crisis of commitment and communal relationships, many young people are making common cause before the problems of our world and are taking up various forms of activism and volunteer work. Some take part in the life of the Church as members of service groups and various missionary initiatives in their own dioceses and in other places.

Many places are experiencing a dearth of vocations to the priesthood and consecrated life. This is often due to a lack of contagious apostolic fervour in communities which results in a cooling of enthusiasm and attractiveness. Wherever there is life, fervour and a desire to bring Christ to others, genuine vocations will arise. Even in parishes where priests are not particularly committed or joyful, the fraternal life and fervour of the community can awaken in the young a desire to consecrate themselves completely to God and to the preaching of the Gospel.

This is particularly true if such a living community prays insistently for vocations and courageously proposes to its young people the path of special consecration. On the other hand, despite the scarcity of vocations, today we are increasingly aware of the need for a better process of selecting candidates to the priesthood.

Seminaries cannot accept candidates on the basis of any motivation whatsoever, especially if those motivations have to do with affective insecurity or the pursuit of power, human glory or economic well-being. As I mentioned above, I have not sought to offer a complete diagnosis, but I invite communities to complete and enrich these perspectives on the basis of their awareness of the challenges facing them and their neighbours. It is my hope that, in doing so, they will realize that whenever we attempt to read the signs of the times it is helpful to listen to young people and the elderly.

Both represent a source of hope for every people. The elderly bring with them memory and the wisdom of experience, which warns us not to foolishly repeat our past mistakes. Challenges exist to be overcome! Let us be realists, but without losing our joy, our boldness and our hope-filled commitment. Let us not allow ourselves to be robbed of missionary vigour! The entire people of God proclaims the Gospel. Evangelization is the task of the Church. The Church, as the agent of evangelization, is more than an organic and hierarchical institution; she is first and foremost a people advancing on its pilgrim way towards God.

She is certainly a mystery rooted in the Trinity, yet she exists concretely in history as a people of pilgrims and evangelizers, transcending any institutional expression, however necessary. I would like to dwell briefly on this way of understanding the Church, whose ultimate foundation is in the free and gracious initiative of God. The salvation which God offers us is the work of his mercy.

No human efforts, however good they may be, can enable us to merit so great a gift. God, by his sheer grace, draws us to himself and makes us one with him. The Church is sent by Jesus Christ as the sacrament of the salvation offered by God. The salvation which God has wrought, and the Church joyfully proclaims, is for everyone. He has chosen to call them together as a people and not as isolated individuals. God attracts us by taking into account the complex interweaving of personal relationships entailed in the life of a human community.

This people which God has chosen and called is the Church. Jesus did not tell the apostles to form an exclusive and elite group. To those who feel far from God and the Church, to all those who are fearful or indifferent, I would like to say this: the Lord, with great respect and love, is also calling you to be a part of his people! The Church must be a place of mercy freely given, where everyone can feel welcomed, loved, forgiven and encouraged to live the good life of the Gospel. If you already see Jesus as something of a hippie, you won't take much new away from this book.

The author formats the text in a manner not unlike poetry, with ample use of line breaks, shape, and location within the page. However, the novel utilization of superficially poetic format lacks as much effect as one m Though it's billed as a book for non-Christians, it seems much more appropriate for explaining to religious conservatives that Jesus is and was much less of a dictator than many believe.

However, the novel utilization of superficially poetic format lacks as much effect as one might hope. In fact, one starts to expect that the format was used, instead, as a playful way to increase the page count. A good idea, perhaps, but rather poorly executed. Aug 29, David Brown rated it really liked it Shelves: religion-spirituality , nonfiction. This is a Christian Primer like no other you have seen. For those of you desiring more art in faith this is the book for you. It explores the reality of Jesus as a man as well as God.

Written in sense lines the book flows like one long poem that reveals a Jesus that is easy to fall in love with and fear his call on your life at the same time. Jan 03, Bree rated it it was amazing Shelves: faith. A small, simple book that truly drives home that many human, divine, and wonderful characteristics of Christ. This book was an incredible comfort to me in high school, when I was beginning to doubt the existence of God and the value of the Church.

Nov 15, Craig Kendall rated it it was amazing. As unique as the style is that Don used to write this book, the content that is poured into the unique style is equally unique. I've recommended it to numerous folks who, like me have been moved and challenged by it. It will stretch and challenge your thinking of what it means to be like Jesus. Jul 14, Rebecca rated it really liked it Shelves: misc-history , religious. A plain language attempt to get at the heart of Christianity. While its tagline says it's for skeptics I also think it's good for those of us who have grown up in the church as a challenge and to refocus us.

Jan 07, Josie rated it it was ok Shelves: religion. I liked the premise but didn't much care for the actual book. Sep 05, Andrea rated it it was amazing Shelves: andis-favorites. A very simple to understand, easy to read book about a very complex thing. Be God's hands and feet. Oct 07, Rachel rated it really liked it. Nuggets and bullet points about Jesus and the Bible written in contemporary language. Sep 30, Emma rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Everyone.

Loved It!!!!!!!!!! Jan 11, Joanna rated it it was amazing. I truly loved this book. I would give it a 6-star rating if I could. It was a great challenge for me to not stop and mark and asterisk and underline and to just read it. I'm glad I went that route - it was a wonderful reading experience. The book is written in what are called "sense lines" a phrase I had never heard of before. I will probably re-read this book at least once this I truly loved this book. I will probably re-read this book at least once this year.

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So maybe when I go re-read it, I can come edit the review with it all fresh in my mind I read it a couple of weeks ago and my memory is a bit black-hole-ish. Oct 08, Dwayne A Milley rated it really liked it. I liked it. The book is 20 years old, and more needed today than it was then. I really enjoyed this book.

I have been trying to figure out my relationship with God and after reading this, I defiantly feel as if I have a better understanding of him. Throughout the book, there are a lot of references about God that I can understand easily and some of them even relate too. I liked how the book broke down everything from what Jesus started out as to prayer and things like that. I would recommend this book to those who are questioning their relationship with God and those who I really enjoyed this book. I would recommend this book to those who are questioning their relationship with God and those who are looking to know more about Jesus.

Jan 12, Kate Gilbert rated it really liked it. Interesting structure and syntax. I like how this book looks differently at a story that we often hear. I recommended this book to my friend who is a new Christian, and I think it was very helpful to her. We often talk about our faith together and it is nice to have a book to refer to.

Jul 02, Mary rated it really liked it Shelves: research-helps-for-my-own-book. Written like poetry, this little gem aims to illustrate with words that which is sublime.