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Module Content: This module deals with a range of issues including: the quality of information available about crime in Ireland, the problems of explaining crime, the rising importance of corporate crime, the relationship between gender and crime, the problems of policing Irish society, the punishment of criminals and the problems of reducing crime. Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to: Give a clear account of the picture of crime in Ireland that emerges from official accounts and official statistics. They should also be aware of the significant limitations that exist in relation to such statistics.

Know what it means to say that crime is "socially constructed". Be able to compare and contrast the major sociological perspectives, both historical and contemporary, on the causes of crime and of criminal behaviour. Know the significance of white collar or corporate crime for the understanding of crime generally. Understand the relationship between gender and crime both at the level of crime and the level of victimisation Understand the nature and culture of policing in contemporary Ireland and be familiar with the debates around the privatising of the policing function Know the various justifications that have been offered for prison as a form of punishment and also be familiar with the literature of the success or otherwise of prison and the range of alternatives that have been proposed to it.

SC Race and Ethnicity. Module Objective: This course will theorise and examine race, ethnicity and migration in the Irish and European contexts. Module Content: The couse will discuss and debate the following issues: What is meant by race, ethnicity and racialisation? Why do societies generate racism, prejudice and discrimination? How does migration link to ethnicity and racism in the contemporary 1 European and 2 Irish context? Case studies including, the Irish Travelling Community Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to understand an in-depth exploration of the sociology of 'race', racism and ethnic divisions.

Evaluate the social origins and significance of racial and ethnic divisions; the varied causes, contexts and consequences of racism; Address the cultural consequences of migration in the Irish and European contexts. Apply theory, research findings and case study material in the field Develop historical and international comparisons. Attendance at lectures. A pass Continuous Assessment mark is carried forward, Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

SOCIOLOGY - Max Weber

SC The Sociology of Gender. Module Objective: To provide an introduction to the field of gender studies in sociology and to substantiate the centrality of gender relations to an understanding of society and social change. Module Content: First, the module will provide an overview of the impact of feminism on the discipline of sociology. Second, the concept of gender relations will be examined, with an emphasis on the social constructedness of all femininities and masculinities.


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The mark for attendance is carried forward. SC Sociology of the Family. Module Objective: To examine specific aspects of contemporary family life in relation to social research and theory. Families continue to flourish in their diversity. This module examines specific aspects of contemporary family life in relation to social research and theory.

Part 1 provides a critical analysis of theoretical approaches to the family and elucidates macro social trends and processes. Part 2 examines specific dimensions of contemporary family life and challenges current debates. The Irish case is considered in each section. Learning Outcomes: Students who take this course should be able to: Examine specific aspects of contemporary family life in relation to research, policy and social theory. Critically analyse theoretical approaches to the family Identify social trends and processes in the arena of family life Evaluate the changes occurring in contemporary family life Assessment: Total Marks Continuous Assessment marks 1 x 3, word Essay.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated as prescribed by the department. Module Objective: To provide a comprehensive introduction to the sociology of health and illness. Module Content: Students will be introduced to classical and new social theories in the area of health and illness. The various perspectives and analytical approaches will be developed in connection with a number of substantive areas and topics.

These will include the history of the changing concepts of health and illness, medicine as a form of social power and the historical formation of health-care professions and occupations, the biomedical model and medical discourse, sociological critiques of the general model of illness categories and the various shifts that have occurred in the nature and understanding of health and illness.

The course will also explore the social causation of health and illness, socio-economic inequalities and gender issues in health. A case study approach will be adopted as a way of introducing students to some of the changing concepts and pressing issues that have entered health discourse and practice, for example the concepts of risk, responsibility and lifestyle.

Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course students should be able to: Demonstrate the following sociological cognitive competencies: Knowledge; Comprehension; Application; Analysis; Synthesis; Evaluation. Specifically, students should be able to: - Describe the field of the sociology of health and illness, outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.

A pass Continuous Assessment mark is carried forward, Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department. SC Cultures of Cities. Module Objective: To explore key classical and contemporary theorists of urban culture within the broader context of Modernity and post-Modernity.

Module Content: This module looks at characteristic aspects of cultures of cities in terms of their being symptomatic of broader processes of transformation of Modernity. The module begins by showing how the discussion of urban cultural forms is synonymous with the study of modernity in general. The city is first sketched within the terms of classical social theorists Weber, Marx, Durkheim, Freud and others. Next, the formulations of the city by George Simmel and Walter Benjamin are examined, and the methodology for the study of urban culture proffered by their work is considered.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed elements of Continuous Assessment are carried forward.

Selected publications : Gerard Delanty : University of Sussex

Students must repeat failed elements of Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department. Module Objective: To provide an overview of contemporary social theory with a view to clarifying the principles of theory construction. Module Content: This module provides a general yet contextually sensitive overview of post-war and especially 20th Century social theory from a variety of points of view. The major theoretical traditions are covered in a way that allows the student to develop an understanding both of leading authors and of basic concepts and theoretical models.

Learning Outcomes: Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module, students should be able to: Give a historical overview of the development of social theory in relation to its changing socio-historical context between the midth century and the present. Outline what social theory is, and identify the major contemporary directions and the figures representing them. Compare and contrast the contributions of at least two major contemporary social theorists. Outline and critically evaluate the contribution of a major contemporary social theorist.

Present and analyse the basic contemporary social theoretical concepts and models. A pass Continuous Assessment mark is carried forward, Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated As prescribed by the Department. SC Current Debates in Sociology. Module Objective: This module will introduce students to contemporary issues in debates which are central to the discipline of Sociology.

Module Content: Students have to choose one of the following Seminars: Family, Gender, Sexuality Critical Sociology Aspects of Irish Society Sociology of Democratization Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to: Describe and analyse processes of societal transformation examined in the seminar taken. Compare and contrast different factors and forces operative in social life. Relate their own beliefs, ideas and attitudes to a particular field of contemporary society and its analysis.

Design a plan for the sociological analysis of the area of contemporary society being studied. Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SC The Sociology of Community. Module Objective: To understand community as social system, as concept, as ideology and as utopia. At the end of this course students should be able to: Module Content: To sensitise the student to the many manifestations of community and thereby to encourage greater awareness of developments, in both sociological theory and method, which are more appropriate for handling a phenomenon such as community. The module will also explore not only the nature of community per se, but also will examine its social and political contexts.

Module Objective: This module will introduce students to the history and the development of planning as a professional practice. Module Content: Core principles of modern planning, planning theory, settings and contexts of planning, values and ethics underpinning contemporary planning. Learning Outcomes: On the successful completion of the module, students will be able to: Demonstrate an understanding of issues in strategic planning Describe the main planning process Understand the dynamic influence of society, the environment and the economy Engage with contemporary dialogues in planning Assessment: Total Marks End of Year Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks.

SC The Sociology of Religion. Module Objective: To develop themes and issues in the sociological study of religion in contemporary society. Module Content: Understanding religion in modernity; secularisation revisited; the rise of new religious movements; Traditionalism and fundamentalism in contemporary religious movements, varieties of religious experiences.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, the student will be able to: - present a historical overview of the main approaches in the sociology of religion, especially the historically and anthropologically based ones; - understand and evaluate the theories of secularisation and their problems; - gain an understanding of the contexts in which the main world religions emerged and developed; - gain familiarity with some of the main current issues in the sociology of religion, like fundamentalism, the practice of pilgrimage, and the nature of religious experiences; - compare the rise and spread of Christianity and Islam.

SC Sociology of the Media. Module Objective: To introduce students to the main themes in the sociological study of the mass media. Module Content: This module deals with the various approaches that have developed in sociology to understand the power of the mass media. These include: the concern with the manipulative power of the media; the role of the media as a source of information in society and the issues of bias, selectivity and framing that this raises; the power and influence of television fiction; the production of the media messages and the power of the media audience to resist, subvert or ignore the messages of the media.

SC Research Project ll. Module Objective: To provide a discursive environment enabling students carry out an extensive research project. Module Content: Taking the form of seminars, this module focuses on a substantive research topic e. Through the discussion of theory, methodology and research, the participants are initially prepared for individual research on selected aspects of the topic. Subsequently, the emphasis shifts to the discussion of the research in progress and the presentation of research projects and research essays to the group. Learning Outcomes: Students who liaise with their supervisor and complete their Sociology Research Project are offered a wide range of opportunities to develop new competencies and transferable disciplinary skills.

On completion of the project students should be able to: Describe both the subject matter and aim of the research Summarize and discuss the theoretical literature relevant to the substantive subject matter of the project Critically evaluate the methodological literature relevant to the project and clearly describe the methods utilized during the course of empirical research Synthesize their empirical research and theoretical knowledge in order to develop new understandings of their selected topic.

Assessment: Total Marks Continuous Assessment marks 1 x 10, word Research Project marks - submission of a literature review 20 marks- Attendance 10 marks. Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Resubmission of revised Project, as prescribed by the Department. SC Research Seminars and Project. Assessment: Total Marks Continuous Assessment marks 1 x 10, word Research Project marks, submission of literature review 30 marks, Attendance 15 marks. Lecturer s : Dr Kathleen R.

Module Objective: To provide students with a thorough grounding in the debates through which the sociology of health and illness have developed and to connect these debates to some of the more pressing issues around health and disease in contemporary society. Module Content: This course provides a comprehensive overview of contemporary debates in the area of health an illness, situating them in the context of ongoing debates on modernity and reflexivity, risk society, citizenship and globalisation. The course will centrally explore the ethico-political endeavour of modern medicine.

This will be critically re-examined in the light of significant social changes and contemporary debates about the role of modern medicine, the expansion of its jurisdiction, the cultural imperative of health, the role of public health and health promotion, and the impact of medical technologies on social and political environments. Health issues in the context of the developing world will also be addressed with respect to competing knowledge claims, sociological theories of development and global inequality.

Substantive areas of enquiry will be explored with respect to new directions in the Sociology of Health and Illness and contemporary issues and debates. Assessment: Total Marks Continuous Assessment marks 2 x 2, word essays 45 marks each, attendance 10 marks. Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated as prescribed by the Department , Marks in passed elements of Continuous Assessment are carried forward.

Module Content: This course provides a comprehensive overview of contemporary debates in the area of health and illness, situating them in the context of ongoing debates on modernity and reflexivity, risk society, citizenship and globalisation. Assessment: Total Marks Continuous Assessment marks 2 x 2, word essays 45 marks each, Attendance 10 marks.

SC Sociology of the Environment. Module Objective: To trace the social, historical and cultural bases of environmental concern and the development of the institutional framework for environmental protection in Ireland. Module Content: An examination of the evolution of environmental concern in Ireland in a comparative sociological perspective. This module looks at the formation of voluntary organisations, the construction of a state apparatus for environmental protection and the key changes in environmental concern up to the s. Specific attention will be given to recent developments in social theory regarding the relationship between culture and nature.

In particular, the module will explore the basis of environmental controversy in Ireland, in the context of broader changes in attitudes towards nature. Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course students should be able to: Describe the field of the Sociology of the Environment, outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.

Identify key sociological theories and paradigms and define key concepts and ideas in the sociology of the environment Apply sociological theories and concepts to key debates and controversies in Ireland and the EU more generally. Analyse specific controversies, problems and issues using sociological concepts and theories. Explain the social and political institutionalisation of environmental discourse in Ireland. Evaluate the social dimensions of contemporary environmental issues. Module Objective: To introduce students to the basic concerns that arise when we study death, dying and bereavement from a sociological perspective.

Module Content: This module deals with a number of issues: death, embodiment and social structure, medicine, modernity and the risks of life, the revival of death awareness, the experiencing of death, and grief and resurrective practices. Requirements for Supplemental Examination: A pass Continuous Assessment mark is carried forward The mark for attendance is also carried forward , Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated As prescribed by the Department.

SC Globalisation and Development. Module Objective: To introduce students to the concept of globalisation and the major theories of development and to illustrate how the development project has been affected by growing awareness of globalisation. Module Content: The course begins with a historical overview of the concept of globalisation. The second section examines the roots of the development project and the major schools of development theory. The third part of the course reviews various theories of globalisation and explores how these frameworks have altered development theory.

Structuration theory

The final section examines responses to globalisation and reviews case studies illustrating the impact of globalisation on development projects. On completion of the course, students should be able to List, describe and outline the main ideas and arguments of each of the theorists presented in the course Summarise, discuss and compare the theories and case studies presented in the course Critically evaluate the relevance of sociological concepts, theoretical insights and research data for the analysis of global inequality in economic, political and cultural forms Draw on their experiential knowledge and on theoretical and empirical knowledge in the synthesis of new understandings of contemporary globalisation and development issues.

Module Objective: Through substantive sociological and social policy analysis the module will focus on historical, contemporary and emerging practices of architecture, housing, consumption and home-making. Module Content: Historical and contemporary housing models will be examined using sociological and social policy paradigms to explore the relationship between the built environment and social order and reproduction.

Module Objective: To explore a series of issues in the study of crime and deviance Module Content: This module deals with a range of issues: the quality of information available about crime in Ireland, the problems of explaining crime, the rising importance of corporate crime, the relationship between gender and crime, the problems ofn policing Irish society, the punishment of criminals and the problems of reducing crime.

A pass Continuous Assessment mark is carried forward as prescribed by the Department. SC Philosophy of Social Science. Module Objective: To introduce the student to the philosophy of social science. Module Content: Historical introduction to the different epistemological-methodological traditions in social science, an exploration of both historical and contemporary methodological disputes and problems. Among the traditions to be reviewed are the positivist, pragmatist, interpretative, critical, functionalist, structuralist and feminist directions. Such methodological discussions as the explanation-understanding controversy, the positivist dispute and both the current feminist epistemology and constructivism-realism debates are covered.

As regards methodological problems, the module focuses on the development of methodological frameworks through which social theory is made serviceable for social research purposes. Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to: Give a historical overview of the development of the philosophy of social science.

Outline what the philosophy of social science is, and identify the key concepts of the field. Outline the major controversies in the philosophy of social science, and analyse the issue s at stake therein. Outline and evaluate the contribution of a major philosopher of social science. Compare and contrast the basic methodological paradigms in the social sciences. Outline and critically evaluate at least two of leading contemporary philosophies of social science.

Module Objective: To develop the students understanding of sociological theory, concepts, methods and arguments, and to apply a sociological perspective to an analysis of current debates in health and medicine. To incorporate sociological research and theoretical insights into the building of new health-related knowledge. To facilitate the acquisition of health-care professionals of sociological skills, and to engender the confidence to use these in analysis, research and the building of new health-care knowledge.

Sociological Theory and Nursing practice: are they compatible? Issues of power, knowledge and discourse, the social process of knowledge production, communication and the media. Biomedical, Complementary and Alternative Models of Healthcare. Nursing professionalisation and the production of new nursing knowledge. Bureaucracy in healthcare, a barrier to organisational change. Lay-professional and Inter-Professional interaction in Healthcare. Changing models of healthcare, co-cultural and multicultural approaches. Isaac, J. After Empiricism: The Realist Alternative. Ball ed. Keat, R.

Urry : Social Theory as Science , 2nd edn. Kuutti, K. Dordrecht: Kluwer, pp. Lawson, T. Realism and Instrumentalism in the Development of Econometrics. Gilbert and N. De Marchi eds. Oxford: Oxford University Press. A Realist Theory for Economics. Backhouse ed. London: Routledge, pp. Layder, D. London: Sage. The Promise of Realism. Philosophy of the Social Sciences , vol.

London: UCL Press. Magill, R. Barkley, N. Morin, J. Schnase and B. Manicas, P. Oxford: Blackwell Science. Accounting, Organizations and Society , vol. American Psychologist , vol. McLennan, G. Morin, N. Portland: Dioscorides Press, pp. Whetstone, D. Wilken and K. Tomlinson eds. Morris, B. Critique of Anthropology , vol.

Nardi, B. Kyng and L. Mathiassen eds. Orlikowski, W. MIS Quarterly , vol. Outhwaite, W. Basingstoke, UK: Macmillan.


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  • Pateman, T. Oxford: Clarendon Press. Pawson, R. British Journal of Sociology , vol. Tilley : Realistic Evaluation. Reason, J. Ryan, S. Journal of Advanced Nursing , vol. Sayer, A. Johnston ed. London: Methuen, pp. Schnase, J. Kama, K. Tomlinson, J. Cunnius and N. Journal of Network and Computer Applications , vol. Spasser, M. Spasser, Mark A. Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems , vol. Star, S. Huhs and L. Gasser eds.

    Social Studies of Science , vol. Stones, R. New York: St. Martin's Press. Tomlinson, K. Spasser, J. II: Digital Documents Track. Spasser and J. In WebNet '97 Proceedings Online. Wainwright, S. Weber, M. New York: Free Press. Wenger, E. Will, D.