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Foundations of the Anthropology of Gender

Guattari, Felix. Sweet, Jarred Becker, and Taylor Adkins. Los Angeles: Semiotext e , p. Germaine M. Buck Louis, Enrique F. Schisterman, Anne M. Sweeney, Timothy C. Wilcosky, Robert E. Fonow, Mary Margaret, and Judith Cook. Indiana University Press, Gergen, Mary M. Haraway, Donna. Whose Science? Hubbard, Ruth. Messing, K. Environmental Research. Nelson, E.

Nielsen, Joyce McCarl. Westview, Phillips SP. Measuring the health effects of gender. Oxford, Rosser, Sue. Scheman, Naomi. Routledge, , pp. Williams, Walter. Module 5: Gender and sex Lead author: Dr. What temporal and spatial scales are you seeing these factors at work in? How might a student who identifies as another gender, respond to my work? Why or Why not? What do you feel you have to offer this topic and this pedagogical work?

From your personal experience? What assumptions are you bringing to the table? Discuss as a team how to achieve the right balance for your course. As do physicists and chemists. Bring in people for whom these questions are vital. What chemicals bleach the cotton that tampons are made out of? What heavy metals are in the cotton? What plasticization is in the tampon applicators? What synthetic chemicals are in hormone pills that remain active in urine? What do you want to find out?

Where do you want to study? Which humans? Canada What health issues are you concerned with, or funded to investigate? Most all the hyperlinked references you cited came from the same publication source. Some of them have the same researchers. Can you provide a link to the full studies. Abstracts do not list methods, controls and many more detailed data points. I have read the full open source scientific rebuttals to these research articles some time ago.

I would like to do a side by side comparison. Anyway I like to form my own opinions and rather not let an opinion piece inform my intelligence. Please excuse my mistrust in modern media. This article is bias. Her one-theory-fits-all assertions do not take into account the large number of trans folk who do not fit her self-professed model.

Here is conclusion of the original study that Anne A. Alternatively, it must also be taken into consideration that changes in BSTc volume in male-to-female transsexuals may be the result of a failure to develop a male-like gender identity. In summary, our finding of a sex difference in BSTc volume only in adulthood suggests that marked sex-dependent organizational changes in brain structure are not limited to early development but may extend into adulthood.

The study is pretty much only says that the development of the brain structure may extend into adulthood. The faulty conclusion that Lawrence is drawing here is the assumption all trans people start their transition in the late 20s or later, but claim they knew they were a different sex than assigned to them at birth at a young age. She then makes some blatant assumptions about sexual orientation and the implication of the sexual identity aspects of our brain, because she believes trans individuals are at the heart individuals with a sexual fetish to believe they are the opposite sex.

You can see that view thoroughly debunked by respectable scientists everywhere. More importantly, she is attempting to use a sample size of seven individuals to make sweeping generalizations about how anatomy works, even though one of the individuals does not fit her methodology. She even mentions that within her notes. Her entire premise is that any time trans individuals have a neuroanatomy that reflects their identified gender as opposed to their sex assigned at birth, it had to be because of late stage hormone therapy. In short, her criticism is written top-down, where she went in looking for answers and bent the information fit her model.

There is a reason why scientists tend to draw similar conclusions based on peer reviewed work. Because when valid criticism arises, objectivity allows us to reexamine our understanding of the world and gives us an interest into conducting more studies. If there was validity to her criticisms, this would be the new norm. Thanks so much for this article. I intuitively knew this article was bogus and that there is no possible way this trans disease could be anything other than a mental illness. It is highly unlikely and illogical to me that a person can be a man in every biological way, but somehow their brain formed as female???

What do credentials have to do with it? That is an argument from authority and an invalid argument. I, too, think the data posted is NOT good as one can easily find contradictory data that stands on a much better methodological footing. The data and the argument made from it is analogous to claiming that Taylor Swift is actually a man since she exhibits the average height of a male. That could be true, but unfortunately stands on such a thin basis that if one is willing to justify one based on the other, the sky is the limit.

No wonder we have entire communities who subscribed to the idea of a conceptual penis: that one cannot tell the difference between a mangled penis and a vagina. This political and ideological agenda is going to come to a head in the next years, especially with people encouraging parents to surgically and chemically castrate their children because they apparently want to shop in the opposite isle of the Toys R Us. Please stop with the scare mongering about castration. Yes there will always be those rich enough to circumvent the rules.

Given that you appear to be arguing against the evidence presented in this article, and supporting comments, it is incumbent on you to provide evidence that the experts referenced in the article and comments are either not experts in this field, or are wrong.

Thus far you have done neither of these, just made an incorrect call on the use of a fallacy. Well said friend! I am dumbfounded what parents, doctors and society is allowing with this especially children who are on hormones and go through surgeries at very young ages! What happened to the requirement that you have to be 18? There is no doubt this contributes to depression and part of the high suicide rate. A year later I join this discussion …. The consequences of this child abuse are far reaching.

My heart goes out to those who suffer for any reason, but demanding rights is not the answer. There are more human rights today in our society, and more abundance than any civilization in history Jordan B. Oh this is NOT one of the examples of offence leading to greatness. No greatness in me. I just had to pee. But there is gratitude. Agree or disagree on the gender spectrum, but no one should be taught to rely on an entire society changing, protest and demand words that they want to come out of another human beings mouth.

We should live our individual lives and fuction from a relationship standpoint. My ex husband was abusive and horrible… Did I stick around and demand he speak words that I want him to?? Or did I choose to cut him out of my circle of influence? Many of these issues arise randomly and in tiny human interactions.

Sexual Harassment Prevention Training Part 2: Case Studies

End relationships, even brief encounters with those who feel toxic to you. In this polical climate an employer will get eaten alive like Star Bucks of they dare mistreat a transperson. But for day to day interactions? It never worked in any human interaction except a dictatorship for one side to scream louder and demand the other side speaks words after being forced by law.

This is the immature problem solving logic of a tantrum throwing child. Iv, clearly you live in a bubble. You are comparing the discomfort of peeing in a hole with the discomfort of living in the wrong body? False equivalency. No where near the same thing, not even close. Then you compare the widespread mistreatment and abuse of transgender people to one bad relationship you had? Again, false equivalency. Totally different. Trans people are abused everywhere they go. Look at this comment section. Look at the percentage of people, including you, who reject trans people.

Thank you, Jorge, for this sane logical response! It sums up what I have read, thought, and felt about the subject quite perfectly, but it expressed so much more coherently than I could have ever tried to! That is insane and how radically far nutz the ideological movement has pressed. This Health Education Framework, which is reviewed in hearings and edited by the Instructional Quality Commission IQC , serves as a guideline for implementing the content standards adopted by the SBE for health education curriculum.

PJI testified at prior IQC meetings in Sacramento in the past several months and works to block controversial content from being pushed on children in the public school system. These are just a few of the many concerning, ideologically-driven aspects of the proposed Framework:. My Princess Boy Chapter 3, pp. Planned Parenthood Chapter 5, p. Spiritual Abuse Chapter 5, p. Also your statement about there being two genders but people could feel like the other or neither is a simple contradiction.

Likewise while a mind may experience a large number of things. A delusional man may think he hears a phone ringing. The phone does not exist except in his mind. Him hearing it does not make it real. Likewise thinking oneself is another gender or not a gender does not make it so. Biologically and neurologically there are more then two genders that what these studies st Harvard and other universities show.

Its true I believe your comment because is based on unification lines of original human beings. I think you hit the nail on the head. I am a cisgender female but have Trans friends. People who know nothing will argue with you because they feel threatened. They have to deny it out of fear that someone will think they are Trans or Gay.

It drives me nuts. Trans people who come out are some of the most courageous people I know. I am sorry where do feelings or damage come into the scientific method? While it may or may not be black and white science is Boolean. It is either true or untrue. Regardless of who is harmed in the process. Actually science is not Boolean…. A means to understand how things work basically. Emotions over logic with this crowd, as usual. The rejection, harassment, and shame imposed on them by an unaccepting society does cause significant mental damage to them, to the point where they are more likely to commit suicide.

I think you may be confusing sex with gender, Justin. The fact that we are a sexually dimorphic species means there are two sexes. Gender expectations vary between cultures and can change over time. In other words, abolish the idea of gender altogether. I agree sort of but according to some biological studies certain intersex is a third sex.

Sex isnt as simple or only XY and XX. Gender is a real thing as well. The is psychological evidence of it. Its as real and important to a person as money which has importance due to society. We cannot abolish gender when we naturally have gender identities or not. It seems to make much more sense to just have male, female, and intersex, and then realize that genitals do not necessarily make a person a certain way. Use neutral pronouns for everyone. You are who you are and if you want to reproduce, then you can find someone else who would be compatible for that.

The Who the hell are you to come along as the mere 0. Ever hear of a democracy and the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few. No gender standard will be accepted by all so I say sorry trans but you must adapt to us… the Sam P. As a quick point, the number of cultures that have a 3rd gender would make your statement a lie.

It seems to only be nations ruled by the religions of the book that have failed to recognise the binary. So please, take your assumptions elsewhere. There are 2 genders. That is that. Where have I seen that kind of comment before? I believe you need to stop confusing transvestism aka transgender with transsexualism. Within the theory of transsexualism sex and gender mean the exact same thing. Gender is just polite way to say sex without implying the reproductive parts of it. I believe I believe you also stated people should stop using the word transsexual. Instead I going you stop misusing it and stop telling people not to use the word.

Delivered PhD’s

From your comments I have seen enough to call bs on you. You cannot be a trans woman without also linking being a male to it aka she-male. I just see you as another autogynephillic terf lover helping them trash the word transsexual and the science. Actually, no. Gender and gender expression are not the same thing.

Not major structures, not all consistent, but a few of these features are consistent. An answer to why we want to transition? This is something I posted on a comment in response to a question on a philosophy forum. They seemed to find it helpful, hopefully others will too. Their question, what is gender, and why are people transgender? In society there are 2 major social groups that people belong to, Male and Female, and people that are Transgender were assigned to the wrong group at birth, so they may belong to the other group, neither group, flit between the groups, or be somewhere in the middle.

This was a follow up question asking for more information as to why people want to transition. Because we identify as the other gender, we look around at the media, advertising, porn, people, etc. So for some people that are only slightly affected, being able to dress and identify with that social group may be enough. Hi honey. I completely understand what is your point but there is a conflict in your writings. I am a trans-feminine girl. That would create a confusion.

A trans-feminine one and I am proud of that and I will die as a Transgender Girl. I will never be a Girl and actually never want to. Cause I am trans and I love it. No, it is not a fact that gender is different from sex. There is no definitive study or science that proves that. There is no science that can definitely prove that this is not a mental illness either. The attached study by no means is definitive and it is riddled with pro-trans bias.

You can post links, just keep the number at around 3 or less to stop the automatic spam filter caught by that one myself. You have actually read the original article, where it lays out the scientific underpinnings of gender in the brain, and how it differs from sex? As this comment is especially ignorant on this particular article.

That is not even close to what biology is. A big issue here is the same can be said about Gender Dysphoria, and Transgender disorder. The definition changed. This is considered a psychological ailment, and it ought to be. They feel something similar to trans folk. The suicide rate for people with this disorder is just a little larger than trans folk. Point being I truly believe we should treat people how they want, within reason of course.

I mean have manors is all. There are certainly scientists that disagree on the merits and meanings behind certain data, but as a whole science has nothing to do with there being more than 2 sexes, or genders for that matter. And if the argument is that gender is a social construct, then the meaning behind the different genders people claim to have has even less merit.

Even the most introspective and self-aware of us will usually have an initial reaction to become defensive. I mean sorry to come off rudely, but that is not what biology is. Biology can have a huge, or not so huge effect on people. In fact, in most cases it does. Again, you do you. Every one of us. The word gender has changed its definition. But I would put fourth that if it has no link to sex, then what is it? Is it truly just a social construct like so many have claimed? And if so, then what significance does it have? I was raised by a single mother along with my sister. Where did I learn them?

My idols were all artists, though I did live sports and trained my ass off, I seldom actually watched them. You could say it was my friends who instilled these things in me, but most of them were girls growing up. Nor do I think it needs to be. Gender is different things to different people. It holds different weight.

People who admit a lack in evidence, but also give me true insight into what gender identity means to them. If you know who you are, great. And whether you believe me or not I really want to help where I can. Biology has nothing to do with your gender. Does this matter? Do any of these labels matter? That seems to be up to the individual. Personally I find them pedantic and limiting. Why put yourself in a box, or multiple boxes in this case. And since it has such a loose definition, am I gender fluid because I do stereotypical female things? Do I always have to be eating a steak and punching someone in the face?

All of these identity crisis pose a similar issue. I bet there are better things about you than your gender. Maybe not. Government and Church have systematically erased them for centuries. As far as the transgendered issue, I believe that this is a mental illness.

You can turn a hotdog into a taco, but you will never actually be a woman. Biologically you are and always will be a man. You gender is purely a social construct, much like being goth or a jock or whatever. You desire to be recognized as a girl is purely social and psychological. You desire for others to recognize you as YOU want them to; not how society tells them they must. But once you step into the locker room or shower with my little girl or wife, we are going to have problems.

Like others have said here, gender is different from sex. They are separated by your sex. Once your clothes are off, there is no difference between you and any other man. Oppression and depression are not synonymous. Black females being one of the most oppressed groups have low depression and virtually non existent suicide rates. So how can society be to blame for it? The very definition of self esteem is that it is self administered. If you require others acceptance that by definition does nothing for your self esteem. Suicide rates among trans-genders is just a shade under schizophrenics.

While gays do not have even close to the same suicide rates despite oppression. And both have the same complaint of not feeling comfortable in their own bodies. We treat body dysmophia by pushing Therapy and acceptance of their bodies and we treat transgender by carving them up like a turkey.

Neither disorders suicide rate drops even post op. So why are we not teaching transgenders to accept their body as made by nature? As transgender people take hormones they take on the physical traits of the gender they are taking the hormones for. Given that this means that M2F people will look more feminine including developing breasts and the muscle and fat distribution of a woman , and F2M people will look more masculine including developing a beard, deep voice, and muscle and fat distribution of a man.

Are you honestly saying that you would prefer someone that looks like a lumberjack, with a beard and a deep voice shares a changing room with your wife and children just because they were born a female? As your argument cuts both ways. The same is true for F2M people, they have more muscle, hair, beard, lower voice, etc. This is before we start getting into any surgery concerns. So do you want to actually think about your argument and give it another go? Focus on the mental illnesses developed from experiencing transphobia before you start saying we are all mentally ill.

Take with it what you may. Sweety as long as something is not harmful and destructive It is not an illness specially a mental one. You need to know that trans gender people are another creation just like many creations of our world. You can not deny it cause it exists and it is proven. Actually if you get to know us we are good people and love to love and be loved. If you have further question do not hesitate to ask. The root cause is mental illness… hormone therapy and transition surgery will only address the symptoms and not address the real problem. This is why suicide rates are nearly as high after surgery as before surgery.

Your last statement is patently false; the suicide rate after surgery is but a fraction of what it is before surgery. This has been documented. Why not turn your anger toward something to be angry about, like white supremacists and neo-Nazis? So , if you feel like a man and you have female body , my question is how do you know the difference in a male mind and a female mind to be so certain? Hence the mental perception will still exist. Another amazing observation I have seen in the sudden burst of gender issues is the support groups on tumbler for teens. Teens are asking an anonymous person who they are and what they need to call themselves?!

What is wrong in this picture? Sounds like an acceptance issue. Next the kid tests the waters by talking about a friend and educating the parent Screaming and yelling at home, depression ,anxiety , low self esteem sets in. Next plan talk about suicide and get admitted to a hospital to get the parents to agree for a name change Ask for a therapy dog Ask for surgeries, binders etc Are these the future of a society? Who is coming up with these names and helping them label themselves?

Almost feels like it is all planned to the T ps I do know and understand the exceptions and I am not referring to them but to the outburst that is happening in schools and colleges I hope the psychiatric association looks into the influence of social media in this strange behavior and include dysphoria as something that needs to be treated before major surgeries are performed and leave the future youth more handicapped to face life for what is worth.

How long will you just treat the anxiety and depression? Time to address the issue and question some obvious scenarios! One can enjoy life without a gender issue! Happiness has no gender! You obviously have no clue as to what being transgender really is. Being transgender is not a mental illness; the depression, paranoia, and other things that could lead to someone taking their own life come from the scorn, ridicule, and rejection that trans people face because they are transgender.

Being disowned by your parents, rejected by friends and family, fired from your job, evicted from your place of dwelling, or being denied health care simply because you are transgender is enough to send anybody over the edge. Now, you go right ahead and keep preaching about the changing times. Meanwhile, the rest of the world will be busy living our lives, trying to stay clear of people like you.

Transferring Knowledge About Sex And Gender Dutch Case studies

Good luck with that. I am transpecied. Ever since I was seven years old I knew that I am a panther stuck in a human body. How awful it has been to live as a human when all I can think of is joining my pack of panthers in the mountains. What he is referring to is biological sex. The last years has not changed that fact. All of the things that define biological sex are still exactly the same today as they were years ago. We get it. The trans community wants change. You all want it yesterday but the change that you really want is nowhere near in sight. Exploring the human mind, talking about trans issues, are things that are never going to change the above.

What will change is that more of society will begin to accept trans people in every way possible excluding sexual relationships. That is not how reality works and that is not how mother nature works. I realize this was posted a while ago, still I need to respond. If you feel that there are only two genders, why are you seeking these kinds of articles out? Clearly you have questions, as do I. While I cannot begin to imagine the things that those who do not identify as their assigned gender go through, I understand looking in the mirror and not liking what I see.

That is difficult, I can change many of the things I do not like, and it would be uncontroversial. I would probably even get more compliments. I know that I would feel better if those around me saw the me that I feel like I am. Being a cisegender women is hard enough, the pressure is crazy at best. Being a person that is perceived as one gender but feeling like the opposite, or both, or none would be devastating.

Every living being deserves respect and equality, that is simple. Okay, a male who has gone through transition surgery is no longer a male, but a female. Your attempting to have a valid opinion simply by suggesting your belief? Do you have proof?


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  • I. Introduction.
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  • From Revolution to Rights in South Africa: Social Movements, NGOs and Popular Politics After Apartheid.
  • Opening the lines of communication between research scientists and the wider community;

Have you studied gender and all its variables? What is your level of education or even experience with anyone who is transgender? Yeah thought so! So how do you explain folks who were assigned male at birth, yet turned out to have ovaries? How do you explain those assigned female at birth, who suddenly start growing a penis in puberty instead of breasts? Are you unfamiliar with academic citation? Review the listed citation. If you are unsure where they are located, review the format of an APA format.

Some of the research does indicate that for some people there may be a biological basis for feeling more akin to the opposite sex due to atypical hormone exposure in utero. However the issue is there is no way to test for this in living people — the bstc size can only be observed post mortem. What this means is that many people who identify as trans may not have any biological condition at all.

For many it may be psychological or caused by social contagion. The huge rise of young people suddenly developing a trans identity after a stint on the internet or lots of their friends coming out as non binary indicates this may well be an aetiology. This then leaves the problem of young people being unecessary medicated. For example multiple personality disorder and repressed memory syndrome, both of which were subsequently shown to be incredibly rare.

Re the article I picked out one reference which was inaccurately discribing. It is quoted that 1. This is completely untrue. The figure is more like 0. The 1. These are women who in middle age develop an adrenal condition where they produce too much testosterone and start to grow a beard. Thus they were NOT born with ambiguous gentialia. They were born with entirely typical female genitalia. The internet and social media have merely provided a means of more broadly disseminating information, and thus those with gender dysphoria are able to find a name for their issue, talk to others with it, and find ways to treat it usually hormone replacement therapy, sometimes surgery.

Is this your real reasoning for your request or is it simply to drive home your political beliefs so that way you can belittle those with opposing views? Then that makes it bias nitpicking and not true research. The article is written under the umbrella of Harvard University and yet I see no in-text citations!

She then uses empty facts and flawed logic couched in scientific terms to full the reader into overlooking the obvious problems. This entire phenomena is caused by Societal norms being enforced on children, we do not have to conform to anything, but we must respect the body we are born into. Dress and act as you wish, society has to educate itself to accept these differences, in South Pacific Islands it is automatically accepted and in Native cultures also, we are the ones developing the dysphoria in our children and lives. The pharmaceutical companies are growing rich perpetuating the surgeries and hormones one becomes defendant on for life.

We should be free to be who we are and never feel our body is against our brain, that dysphoria is fabricated by the system we live in. Freedom means being subject to much manipulation in our society and this is one of those that un fortunately will destroy many before we educate our civilization on the benefits of acceptance of any gender assumption we partake in. Instead of classifying brains as male or female, why not embrace the diversity of brains in a particular sex and accept that whatever brain that inhabits a body, be it a male or female body, is the brain of that corresponding sex.

It would also be interesting to see a study of the brains of ultra-femme men and butch women to see if they are similar to the majority of brains of the opposite sex. In addition to that, compare them to the brains of transgender individuals of their corresponding biological sex. Cheryl Li, I like your ideas about the comparative studies.

Links and Article Heads would be great. At best there is greater diversity in male brains and female brains than previously supposed and gender roles are too rigid. Yes and no. Both could be true. Brain studies show that whilst overall in populations there are some differences in male and female brains across the population, most people are in the middle.

Think of height — men are overall taller than women but there are many taller women and shorter men. Even if there is a biological spectrum of masculine and feminine it is certain that gender roles are very much socialised as well. The idea that we are a blank slate and socialisation is everything is I think untrue. However socialisation can also play a large role as does culture in general. Alas, it does not work that way. Transsexual suffer from dysphoria which can be compared to having a throbbing psychic toothache, or if you have the good fortune of never having had a toothache, then maybe a persistent itch you cannot scratch.

How language is used as a resource for performing and perceiving sexual identity. Drawing on linguistic analyses of pronunciation, word choice, and grammar, questions such as: Is there a gay accent? Why isn't there a lesbian accent? How do transgendered people modify their linguistic behavior when transitioning? How are unmarked heterosexual identities linguistically constructed?

Sexuality as an issue of identity, as well as of desire. Iconic relations between elements of language such as breathy voice quality and high pitch, and aspects of desire such as arousal and excitement. How language encodes ideologies about sexuality; how language is used to talk about sexuality in public discourses about gay marriage and bullying, as well as in personal narratives of coming out. How language encodes dominant ideologies about sexuality, evident in labels for sexual minorities as well as terminology for sex acts.

Discussions of readings, explorations of how sexuality is portrayed in popular media, and analyses of primary data. Final research paper on a topic of student choice. African American Women's Lives. Preference to sophomores. African American women have been placed on the periphery of many historical documents. Drawing largely on primary sources such as letters, personal journals, literature and film, this course explores the everyday lives of African American women in 19th- and 20th-century America.

Wells and Ella Baker, two luminaries of civil rights activism. We will examine the struggles of African American women to define their own lives and improve the social, economic, political and cultural conditions of black communities. This course explores the ways in which women - white and black, immigrant and native born, free and enslaved - lived and labored in American cities during the long nineteenth century.

Together we will examine a variety of primary sources including diaries, municipal and institutional records, newspapers, memoirs, oral histories, and visual culture. We will also consider whose stories are told and explore how historians make sense of times very different from our own. Priority given to History majors and minors. This course explores the long history of ideas about gender and equality.

Transferring knowledge about sex and gender : Dutch case studies

Each week we read, dissect, compare, and critique a set of primary historical documents political and literary from around the world, moving from the 15th century to the present. We tease out changing arguments about education, the body, sexuality, violence, labor, politics, and the very meaning of gender, and we place feminist critics within national and global political contexts. Like other 90 and level courses, 90M will explore basic elements of fiction and nonfiction writing. Students will read a wide variety of stories and essays in order to develop a language for working through the themes, forms, and concerns of the queer prose canon.

Students will complete and workshop a piece of writing that in some way draws upon the aesthetics or sensibilities of the work we have read, culled from exercises completed throughout the quarter. This final piece may be a short story, a personal essay, a chapter from a novel or memoir, or a piece that, in the spirit of queerness, blurs or interrogates standard demarcations of genre.

The course is open to any and all students, regardless of how they define their gender or sexuality. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot. Gender is one of the great social issues of our time. What does it mean to be female or feminine? How has femininity been defined, performed, punished, or celebrated?

Writers are some of our most serious and eloquent investigators of these questions, and in this class we'll read many of our greatest writers on the subject of femininity, as embodied by both men and women, children and adults, protagonists and antagonists. We'll do so in order to develop a history and a vocabulary of femininity so that we may, in this important time, write our own way in to the conversation.

This is first and foremost a creative writing class, and our goals will be to consider in our own work the importance of the feminine across the entire spectrum of gender, sex, and identity. We will also study how we write about femininity, using other writers as models and inspiration. As we engage with these other writers, we will think broadly and bravely, and explore the expressive opportunities inherent in writing.

We will explore our own creative practices through readings, prompted exercises, improv, games, collaboration, workshop, and revision, all with an eye toward writing the feminine future. Although Hip-Hop is frequently associated with homophobia, violence, sexism, and misogyny it continues to resonate with people the world over. By going beyond a surface level critique of Hip-Hop culture, this course explores the ways that queerness operates in and in conjunction with Hip-Hop culture.

Topics covered include Hip-Hop and feminism, tensions between Hip-Hop and queerness, the role of commercialization of Hip-Hop in queer representation and inclusion with the culture, and how the intersections of Hip-Hop and queer theory can speak to issues of identity, power and privilege. We will discuss genres including classical, musical theater, rap, pop, country, and punk as well as queer socialities formed in and through these musical scenes.

We will think critically about the subtleties of musical language and queer affect, the circulation of gay rumors, and the diva as an object of queer obsession while asking how race, gender, and class as well as elitism, status, and taste inform such inquiries. This course is a required training for student leaders of the Seeds of Change initiative. This initiative takes an interdisciplinary approach to STEM education, infusing students' technical training with leadership training through a lens of gender inequality - bringing together key components of feminist pedagogy, service-learning, and experiential education to create a transformational learning experience.

In this three-quarter course Fall, Winter, Spring , student leaders will: learn the core content featured in the Seeds of Change curriculum, reflect on their experiences as both learners and teachers of this content, hone their own leadership and group facilitation skills, and engage as researchers in the initiative's evaluation efforts. Please email kpedersen stanford.

See syllabus for adjusted course schedule and times. Taught by long-time community organizer, Beatriz Herrera. This course explores the theory, practice and history of grassroots community organizing as a method for developing community power to promoting social justice. And we will contextualize these through the theories and practices developed in the racial, gender, queer, environmental, immigrant, housing and economic justice movements to better understand how organizing has been used to engage communities in the process of social change.

Through this class, students will gain the hard skills and analytical tools needed to successfully organize campaigns and movements that work to address complex systems of power, privilege, and oppression. As a Community-Engaged Learning course, students will work directly with community organizations on campaigns to address community needs, deepen their knowledge of theory and history through hands-on practice, and develop a critical analysis of inequality at the structural and interpersonal levels.

Placements with community organizations are limited. Enrollment will be determined on the first day through a simple application process. Students will have the option to continue the course for a second quarter in the Winter, where they will execute a campaign either on campus or in collaboration with their community partner.

Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans and feminist studies. Topics include the emergence of sexuality studies in the academy, social justice and new subjects, science and technology, art and activism, history, film and memory, the documentation and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family.

Students learn to think critically about race, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives. Visual artists have long been in the forefront of social criticism in America. Since the s, various visual strategies have helped emergent progressive political movements articulate and represent complex social issues. We will learn about a spectrum of political art designed to raise social awareness, spark social change and rouse protest. Works such as Judy Chicago's The Dinner Party , Fred Wilson's Mining the Museum , and Glenn Ligon's paintings appropriating fragments from African-American literature all raised awareness by excavating historical evidence of the long legacy resisting marginalization.

For three decades feminist artists Adrian Piper, Barbara Kruger and the Guerilla Girls have combined institutional critique and direct address into a provocative form of criticality. Recent art for social justice is reaching ever broadening publics by redrawing the role of artist and audience exemplified by the democratization of poster making and internet campaigns of Occupy and the Movement for Black Lives.

We will also consider the collective aesthetic activisms in the Post-Occupy era including Global Ultra Luxury Faction, Climate Justice art projects, and the visual culture of Trump era mass protests. Why are each of these examples successful as influential and enduring markers of social criticism? What have these socially responsive practices contributed to our understanding of American history?. The 2 unit option is for graduate students only. Gender in Native American Societies. Junior Seminar and Practicum.

Preference to and required of Feminist Studies majors; others require consent of instuctor. Feminist experiential learning projects related to critical studies in gender and sexuality. Identifying goals, grant proposal writing, and negotiating ethical issues in feminist praxis. Developing the relationship between potential projects and their academic focus in the major. Senior Seminar and Practicum. Required for Feminist Studies majors. Non-majors enrolled with consent of instructor. Students develop oral reports on their practicum and its relationship to their academic work, submit a report draft and revised written analysis of the practicum, and discuss applications of feminist scholarship.

May be repeated once for credit. This 2 unit course will provide students the opportunity to explore possible honors topics, project design, advisor options, and university resources including grants, libraries, and faculty. Students will use their findings to write a proposal to submit to the honors program as well as a proposal to submit to UAR for undergraduate funding.

After completing the proposal, students will have more clear next steps for their honors projects, including summer research needs, spring course selection as it relates to their topic, and building advisor relationships. From childhood, individuals are presented with texts and images about what it means to be female, what it means to be male, but rarely what it means to question that binary. These images and texts also present what it means to be in relationship with one another, and what it means to reject established gender roles.

In this course, students will examine and research how lessons learned from popular culture impact the treatment and expectations of people individually as well as in relationship with each other. Specifically, we will analyze the ways in which news articles, movie clips, magazine advertisements, television commercials as well as other texts present gender identities as binary as well as gender roles of those binary structures. How are the roles and bodies of all genders presented as objects open to scrutiny, critique, exploitation, abuse, and awe?

Through case studies of films and campaign ads, visits to spaces on campus that construct gender binaries, and field trips to off campus sites, we will explore how representations of gender challenge or reinforce messages in popular media. Discussion of current issues and questions related to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. You're Majoring in What?! Why Feminism is Still Relevant. Stanford Feminist Study alum and community activists will join this weekly seminar to share how studying feminism has helped them professionally. In this course, we will explore the history, the development, the critiques and praise of sororities and fraternities.

How do Greek organizations present their activities and goals? What values and roles do they highlight during recruitment? Who joins them? What expectations are there for participants? What are the perceived benefits that come with joining? How are sorority women and fraternity men discussed by outsiders? How do the stereotypes of Greek life impact perceptions of individuals as well as particular sororities and fraternities? Students in this course will interrogate masculinity and its impacts on culture broadly, with a focus on college campuses.

Some questions considered will include: How do structures and expectations of masculinity impact sexual assault and response to sexual assault? Where on campus do we see pressure to perform masculinity? What expectations do some campus communities, such as athletics and Greek life, have of their members to perform and maintain masculinity? How are male identifying individuals expected to behave in communities shaped by masculinity?

What spaces are there for gender non-conforming folks in communities shaped by masculinity? How do structures of masculinity impact expectations of femininity and femme in these spaces and others?. Students bring widely varying experiences of relationships, whether romantic, familial, platonic, sexual, or professional. This course provides students an opportunity to explore how power functions in these relationships. Relying on feminist critiques of power, students will examine how constructions of gender and sexuality impact our daily lives as well as how we relate to others in those relationships while negotiating power.

Activities, readings, and discussions will prompt students to reflect on ways society constructs sex, gender, and intimacy via media and politics. We will explore the following themes through an intersectional lens: codes of masculinity, concepts and practicalities of affirmative consent in straight and LGBTQIA contexts, sexual harassment and sexual empowerment, and the lived experience of dating, romance, and relationships.

Incoming students bring widely varying experiences of intimate relationships, whether romantic, familial, platonic, or sexual. This course provides students an opportunity to examine sexuality as a broad concept encompassing a dimension of our humanity and its surrounding cultural systems, impacting how we relate with one another: our experience of sex, gender, intimacy, and worldview. Activities, readings, and discussions will prompt students to reflect on society constructs sex, gender, and intimacy. Themes will include intersectional feminism and codes of masculinity, concepts and practicalities of affirmative consent in straight and LGBTQIA contexts, gender and sexual identity spectrums, and the lived experience of dating, romance, and relationships.

Internship in Feminist Studies. One unit represents approximately three hours work per week. Required paper. May be repeated for credit. Service Learning Course certified by Haas Center. Prerequisites: Course work in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, written proposal and application form submitted for approval by program office, written consent of faculty sponsor. Course may be taken 3 times total, for a max of 15 units. Gender in the Arab and Middle Eastern City. What are the components of gendered experience in the city, and how are these shaped by history and culture?

This course explores gender norms and gendered experience in the major cities of Arab-majority countries, Iran and Turkey. Assigned historical and sociological readings contextualize feminism in these countries. Established and recent anthropological publications address modernity, mobility, reproduction, consumption, and social movements within urban contexts. Students will engage with some of the key figures shaping debates about gender, class, and Islam in countries of the region typically referenced as North Africa and the Middle East MENA.

They will also evaluate regional media addressing concerns about gender in light of the historical content of the course and related political concepts.

In , Title IX legislation opened up a vast range of opportunities for women in sports. Since then, women's sports have continued to grow yet the fight for recognition and equality persists. Simply put, men's sports are more popular than women's--so much so, in fact, that people often make the hierarchical distinction between "sports" and "women's sports. And, given the well-documented corruption at the highest levels of men's sports, should such an ascent in popularity be the goal for women's sports?

This course will map out and respond to the multifaceted issues that emerge when women enter the sports world. Throughout the quarter, we will explore the fight for gender equality in sports through historical, cultural, and rhetorical lenses. Global Women Leaders: Past and Present. This course will introduce students to global women's history, and focus on the emergence of women political leaders in the 20th century.

We will begin by looking at the history of patriarchy around the world, and then consider the growth of feminist politics.


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We will look at movements for women's self-determination in the 19th and 20th centuries, and women's emergence as national political leaders in the 20th century. We then focus on a series of global women leaders, primarily heads of state, and explore their biographies and historical contributions. What conditions have permitted women to emerge as heads of state in the 20th century?

Have women made a distinctive contribution as heads of state and political activists? In addition to lectures and discussions, class meetings include viewing several films. This discussion group will meet times during the quarter. Course times will be determined at the start of Winter Quarter. For questions, email rmeisels stanford. Repeatable for credit. This class is structured around three motifs: love suicide as a romantic ideal , female desire, and same-sex sexuality.

Over the course of the quarter we will look at how these motifs are treated in the art and entertainment from three different moments of Japanese history: the Edo period , the modern period , and the contemporary period present. We will start by focusing on the most traditional representations of these topics. Subsequently, we will consider how later artists and entertainers revisited the conventional treatments of these motifs, informing them with new meanings and social significance.

We will devote particular attention to how this material comments upon issues of gender, sexuality, and human relationships in the context of Japan. Informing our perspective will be feminist and queer theories of reading and interpretation. Reproductive Politics in the United States and Abroad. Course description: This course examines the issues and debates surrounding women's reproduction in the United States and beyond. Topics include: birth control, population control, abortion, sex education, sex trafficking, genetic counseling, assisted reproductive technologies, midwifery, breastfeeding, menstruation, and reproductive hazards.

Remarkable breakthroughs In conceptions of the gendered self are everywhere evident in literature and the arts, beginning primarily with the Early Modern world and continuing into today. In so doing, the reader often supplies the presence of the female voice and thereby enters into her self-consciousness and inner thoughts. Transgender and gender-expansive identities are the subject of growing attention and often sensationalist interest in the media as well as in the healthcare field, yet there exists a dearth of legitimate academic courses, research and writing that reflect and explore gender identity and expression as a fluid spectrum rather than a fixed binary.

This course will address transgender and gender expansive identities from historical, medical, literary, developmental and sociopolitical perspectives. Feminist Poetry in the U. We will think broadly about the relationship between politics and poetry, and focus specifically on the influences of second- and third- wave feminism on poetry produced by women in the U.

Sexual Diversity and Health. The format includes a one-day conference featuring a variety of expert speakers covering different aspects of sexual diversity and health, followed by a debriefing and discussion session to integrate what has been heard and learned. Considers the possibility of identifying queer reading and writing practices in early modern England as well the theoretical and historical obstacles such a project necessarily encounters. Study of Renaissance queerness in relation to the classical tradition on the one hand and the contemporary discourses of religion, law, and politics on the other.

Readings include plays, poems, and prose narratives as well as letters, pamphlets, and ephemeral literature. Both major and minor authors will be represented. Psychiatrist Dori Laub has argued that the process of narrating trauma is essential to the healing process. Not only is telling the story important, but it is also crucial to have someone else bear witness to the narrative. But how do people even begin to narrate stories of violence and pain, and how do we become good listeners? How are these stories told and heard in the specific context of queer world making? This course will explore narratives of trauma in queer lives through literature, film, media, and performance in conjunction with trauma theory and psychoanalysis.

We will pay specific attention to questions of community, healing, violence, and affect at the intersections of queerness and race, sex, disability, class, gender, and nationality. This course investigates how culture and diversity shape who becomes an engineer, what problems get solved, and the quality of designs, technology, and products. As a course community, we consider how cultural beliefs about race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, abilities, socioeconomic status, and other intersectional aspects of identity interact with beliefs about engineering, influence diversity in the field, and affect equity in engineering education and practice.

We also explore how engineering cultures and environments respond to and change with individual and institutional agency. The course involves weekly presentations by scholars and engineers, readings, short writing assignments, and discussions. Class attendance is required. This course introduces students to the theoretical and analytical frameworks necessary to critically understand constructions of race, gender, and sexuality in contemporary American film.

Through a sustained engagement with a range of independent and Hollywood films produced since , students analyze the ways that cinematic representations have both reflected and constructed dominant notions of race, gender, and sexuality in the United States. Utilizing an intersectional framework that sees race, gender, and sexuality as always defined by one another, the course examines the ways that dominant notions of difference have been maintained and contested through film in the United States.

This interdisciplinary fine arts course is designed to examine the nature of artistic imagination, sources of creativity and the way this work helps shape social change. We will consider the relationship among muses, mentors and models for queer artists engaged in such fields as visual art, music, theatre, film, creative writing and dance. Exploring various cultures, lands and times, we will study the relationship between memory and vision in serious art. We will ask questions about the role of the artist in the academy and the broader social responsibility of the artist. We will locate some of the similarities and differences among artists, engage with different disciplines, and discover what we can learn from one another.

This seminar requires the strong voices of all participants. To encourage students to take their ideas and questions beyond the classroom, we will be attending art events performances, exhibits, readings individually and in groups. Students will develop their abilities to write well-argued papers. They will stretch their imaginations in the written and oral assignments. And they will grow more confident as public speakers and seminar participants. Transgender Cultural Studies. We will look historically and globally at differences in representation in order to better understand our current cultural moment.

We will explore multiple genres, formats, and authorial points of view to critically think through how and by whom trans stories are told. How do interlocking systems of oppression continue to dictate and drive trans representation and narrative; how do trans authors and artists push back against these systems to re construct their own narrative and image? Archaeology of Gender and Sexuality. How archaeologists study sex, sexuality, and gender through the material remains left behind by past cultures and communities. Theoretical and methodological issues; case studies from prehistoric and historic archaeology.

This course provides an interdisciplinary grounding in historical and theoretical foundations of queer culture and theory. A critical interrogation of sex, gender, sexuality, pleasure, and embodiment will provide students with a framework for producing their own queer cultural critique.

We will explore LGBTQ history alongside contemporary queer issues in popular culture, health, science, government policy, and politics. This course will also address the intersections of sexuality and gender with race, class, ability, age, nationality, and religion. Students will engage with multiple disciplinary approaches that have both shaped queer studies and have been shaped by queer methodology. Sex and Love in Modern U. Social influences on private intimate relations involving romantic love and sexuality.

Topics include the sexual revolution, contraception, dating, hook-ups, cohabitation, sexual orientation, and changing cultural meanings of marriage, gender, and romantic love. Challenging Sex and Gender Dichotomies in Medicine. Explores and challenges the traditional physiological bases for distinguishing human males from females, as well as the psychosocial factors that play a role in experiencing and expressing gender and sexuality.

Topics include the influence of sociocultural gender norms and behaviors on human biology, the interactions of sex and gender on medical outcomes, the importance of understanding the spectrum of sex, gender, and sexuality in clinical practice. Virginia Woolf in the Age of MeToo.

Gender and Sexuality Studies

How does a groundbreaking first wave feminist theorist and novelistic innovator speak intergenerationally? Everything about MeToo can be found in Virginia Woolf's works, from gender oppression, to the politics of women's entry into the public sphere, to the struggle of women to be heard and believed. We begin with A Room of One's Own and Three Guineas , tying them to media coverage of MeToo, then turn to the identity politics of her fiction and to broader histories of feminism and feminist theory.

How can we make sense of a culture of extraordinary sexual repression that nevertheless seemed fully preoccupied with sex? Examination of the depictions of sex in Victorian literary and cultural texts. Critical Issues in International Women's Health. Facilitated discussion about women's lives, from childhood through adolescence, reproductive years, and aging. Economic, social, and human rights factors, and the importance of women's capacities to have good health and manage their lives in the face of societal pressures and obstacles.

Organizations addressing these issues. A requirement of this class is participation in public blogs. Prerequisites: Human Biology core or equivalent or consent of instructor. Sex and Gender in Judaism and Christianity. What role do Jewish and Christian traditions play in shaping understandings of gender differences? Is gender always imagined as dual, male and female? This course explores the variety of ways in which Jewish and Christian traditions - often in conversation with and against each other - have shaped gender identities and sexual politics.

We will explore the central role that issues around marriage and reproduction played in this conversation. Perhaps surprisingly, early Jews and Christian also espoused deep interest in writing about 'eunuchs' and 'androgynes,' as they thought about Jewish and Christian ways of being a man or a woman. We will examine the variety of these early conversations, and the contemporary Jewish and Christian discussions of feminist, queer, trans- and intersex based on them.

How do novels represent sexual life? This course reads texts from the eighteenth century to the present day, and considers how novelists represent the discombobulating effects of desire in fictional prose.

Background

Authors may include: S. Richardson, N. Hawthorne, J. Austen, E. Gissing, H. James, D. Lawrence, J. Joyce, V. Nabokov, J. Baldwin, A. Hollinghurst and Z. Introduction to Queer Theory. What can Queer Theory help us do and undo? Emerging at the intersections of feminist theory, queer activism, and critical race studies in the 's, Queer Theory has become a dynamic interdisciplinary field that informs a wide range of cultural and artistic practices.

This course will introduce students to the development of queer theory as well as core concepts and controversies in the field. While considering theoretical frames for thinking gender, sexuality, and sex, we will explore the possibilities--and limitations--of queer theory with a focus on doing and undoing identity, knowledge, and power. This course is focused on the feminist concept of intersectionality. As a mode of Black feminist thought, lived activist practice, and interdisciplinary research methodology, intersectionality allows us to think about overlapping forms of identity and the interlocking power structures that produce systematic oppression and discrimination.

We will examine the origins and development of intersectional feminism and consider its far-reaching impact in social justice work and contemporary activist movements. As we learn the language, methods, and critiques of intersectionality, we will cover issues related to rights, ethics, privilege, and globalization while discussing social difference on micro- and macro-levels. Transgender Performance and Performativity. This course examines theater, performance art, dance, and embodied practice by transgender artists.

Students will learn the history and politics of transgender performance while considering the creative processes and formal aesthetics trans artists use to make art. We will analyze creative work in conversation with critical and theoretical texts from the fields of performance studies, art history, and queer studies. Masculinity: Technologies and Cultures of Gender.

What is masculinity? How are masculinities invested with power and meaning in cultural contexts? How is anthropological attention to them informed by and extending inquiry across the academy in spheres such as culture studies, political theory, gender studies, history, and science and technology studies? Limited enrollment. Transatlantic Female Modernists. How did American and British women writers express their experiences of modernity? But distinctions of race, class, culture, nation, and literary inheritance were powerful determinants on how individual writers gave voice to their creative aspirations.

This course explores what binds and what differentiates various forms of aesthetic, political, and cultural representation in the works of pioneering transatlantic innovators: Virginia Woolf; Charlotte Perkins Gilman; Zora Neale Hurston; Djuna Barnes; Katherine Mansfield; Nella Larson; Amy Lowell; H.